How to Lace Walking Shoes — 8 Important Lacing Techniques

Lacing your walking shoes properly can help you with so many issues. It prevents injuries, relieve pains, foot issues, and shoe issues such as creasing.

To help you correct these issues, this article will teach you how to lace walking shoes properly.

When you change your lacing technique, it is advisable you test the feel and pressure on your feet for at least 10 minutes before using it permanently.

Shoe Lacing Techniques

Different lacing techniques are suitable for different feet condition and issues. Therefore, we will look at them one after the other. This will allow you to choose which is suitable for you.

Stop Heel Slippage

Having your shoes constantly slipping from your heels can be frustrating as well as embarrassing. However, with this technique, you can prevent such an unpleasant experience from repeating itself.

Here is how to go about it:

i. Start lacing from the second-to-the-last eyelet at the bottom of the shoe.

ii. Lace over and then down into the topmost eyelet of the side you used in step 1. This action should create a sort of “bunny ear”.

iii. Now move to the opposite side of the shoe and repeat steps 1 and 2.

iv. Then lace the “bunny ear” at the other side that you created between the two eyelets.

v. Tie the shoe and make it tight at your ankle. The top of your foot should be tied loosely.

This lacing technique prevents black toenails that occur when the foot moves forward in your shoe and hits the toebox.

Also, blisters that occur as a result of constant foot movement in the shoe can be prevented with this method.

The quality of the shoe also determines how snug the fit will be. One shoe that is highly recommended for the men is the Skechers Men’s AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker.

Click Here to Get the Skechers Men’s AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker Now!

For Narrow Foot

Shoes with a double group of eyelets on either side can be laced starting from the farthest ones from the shoe’s tongue. Doing this will pull the shoe sides closer.

If this does not work, you will have to employ the lace lock technique as we did in the heel slippage lacing technique. The difference will be that your lacing will be through the second and third eyelet.

Here are the steps to follow:

i. Lace the subsequent eyelet on the one side to create a sort of “bunny ear”.

ii. Move to the opposite side of the shoe and repeat step 1.

iii. Then lace the “bunny ear” at the other side that you created between the two eyelets.

iv. Make sure that your lacing is diagonal. Once you are done, a lace lock will be created.

To confirm if it fits, walk around a bit. If there is a need to tighten or loosen the laces; do so.

For ladies with narrow feet, our shoe recommendation would be the Saucony Women’s Omni 16 Running Shoe.

Click Here to Get the Saucony Women’s Omni 16 Running Shoe Now!

For High Instep

This lacing technique is suitable for those with high instep feet.

Follow these steps to perform this technique:

i. Lace the eyelets on each side at the bottom of the shoe.

ii. Lace through the second eyelet at the bottom of the shoe across and down to the left side.

iii. Jump an eyelet and lace through the subsequent eyelet, then lace across and down the opposite eyelet. Repeat this process.

iv. Lace through the eyelet at the top-right of the shoe.

v. Now jump an eyelet and lace through the subsequent eyelet, then lace across and down the opposite eyelet. Repeat this and lace through the eyelet at the top-left to complete the lacing.

A shoe that we recommend that will help ladies within this category is the ASICS Gel-Venture 6 Women’s Running Shoe.

Click Here to Get the ASICS Gel-Venture 6 Women’s Running Shoe Now!

For High Instep and Wide Foot

This technique is used for those with a high instep and a wide foot.

Shoes with a double group of eyelets on either side can be laced starting from the farthest ones from the shoe’s tongue.

To give the foot more space within the shoe, the technique to employ is the window lacing. This technique gives the foot the space it needs, and when you tighten the laces, your instep won’t have a very tight fit.

Here’s how to perform the lacing:

i. Lace the first eyelets at the bottom of the shoe.

ii. Take the laces across and then down straight into the second eyelets.

iii. Lace the third group of eyelets but don’t lace across.

iv. Now lace across the fourth group of eyelets.

v. Then lace up straight into the fifth group of eyelets without crossing over.

vi. Now lace across and up into the sixth group of eyelets.

vii. Repeat this process until you’ve used all the eyelets you want to use before tying the bow.

Walk around with the shoes and loosen the laces if they feel too tight.

For Wide Forefoot and Narrow Heel

Folks with a wide forefoot and narrow heel tend to get frustrated a lot when wearing walking shoes.

This is because getting a shoe that is balanced at both ends is not so easy. Sometimes the forefoot fits, but the heels slip. And sometimes the heel fits, but the forefoot is very narrow.

If you are in this group, you can solve this problem with any of the two solutions below.

Solution 1

The first solution requires the use of two laces. These laces shouldn’t be of the same size; one should be shorter.

Pick one and lace the three eyelets at the bottom of the shoe. Then use the other one to lace the eyelets at the top of the shoe.

Doing this will allow you to amend the tension and the width of the laces. So you can determine how tight the heel and the forefoot will be.

The problem is the possibility that both laces can come undone at the same time. This can still be corrected by using a lace keeper for the bottom laces or just create a permanent loop.

Solution 2

This solution requires the combination of two techniques we discussed above: The window lacing and the lace lock technique.

Here’s how to go about it:

i. Lace the first eyelets at the bottom of the shoe.

ii. Lace across and down the next group of eyelets.

iii. Lace the third group of eyelets but don’t lace across.

iv. Lace across and down the fourth group of eyelets.

v. Lace the fifth group of eyelets but don’t lace across.

vi. Lace across and down the sixth group of eyelets.

vii. Lace down the seventh group of eyelets to create a “bunny ear”, but don’t lace across.

viii. Then lace the “bunny ear” at the other side that you created between the two eyelets.

Once you tie the shoe, check if it fits well at your ankle. However, it should be loose at the top.

Toe Discomfort

This technique will prevent you from experiencing discomfort at your toe area.

Here’s how to perform this lacing:

i. Lace the eyelet at the top-right on one side of the shoe.

ii. Lace through the eyelet at the bottom-left on the other side of the shoe.

iii. Lace down the eyelet at the bottom-right.

iv. Lace across and up the second eyelet at the bottom-left.

v. Lace across and down the second eyelet at the bottom-right, and lace over the firs toe box. Do this until the lacing is complete.

Watch the video below.

Damaged Shoes

This lacing technique is used to correct issues when an eyelet gets damaged. If you are in this group, here’s what you can do:

i. Unlace the shoe to the point where the eyelet broke.

ii. Then skip that damaged eyelet and lace the next good pair.

iii. Lace across the window you made before you lace the good eyelets.

iv. Then tie a surgeon’s knot.

v. Move to the next good eyelets pair and keep lacing normally.

Conclusion

How you lace your walking shoes determines how comfortable and healthy your feet will be. We hope the lacing techniques above have addressed your peculiar lacing needs.

If you have any questions or comments, please let us know in the comments section below.

Click Here to Get the Skechers Men’s AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker Now!